Tag Archives: fishing history

Flyfishing the Holy Land OR Is this thing still on?

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It seems like an eternity since I posted something.  And it has been according to my blogging stats page.  With a new job,  one more move under our belts to upstate New York, and a 10-month old future flyfishing genius, I haven’t been fishing enough or posting.  Moving is second on my list of things I don’t want to do right after dying, and the fishing diminishes with teaching a little one how-to’s. 

Nevertheless!  I did have the opportunity to drive down to the birthplace of American dry-fly fishing around Roscoe, NY.  The mighty Beaverkill River.  

As a gorgeous September day goes, it was a great day to fish.  As water needed to float fish in goes, it was a poor day to fish.  The drive down was great and the changing leaves made for really great backdrop.  The town of Roscoe is awesome, and the whole area (voted Trout Town USA) really is a special place.  

Not knowing a damn thing about where to go, I started at the first pull out I found on the upper Beaverkill.  I fished for a few hours and managed a couple of nice rainbows.  Not sure if this section is stocked or what, but since I had gotten skunked in a Vermont pond a couple of weeks before, and ripped my waders on the Battenkill on the trip before that, just catching fish seemed like it wasn’t going to happen again.  I’m glad it did; stocked fish or not.  

I explored a couple of other Beaverkill pools, but the water was so low that I could have tip toes across most of it.  I can completely see when the fishing is hot however, the pools and spots for fish are fantastic.  I decided to also explore and hit the Willowemoc which joins the Beaverkill at Junction Pool in Roscoe.  The water was flowing a little better and had some nice pools.  It was warm so I just had my rod and one small emerger and made out up river, but ran into someone before walking up.  He told me I should have been there last night (always) and he was going to nap instead of fish because it was warm.  I decided to plod on, and maybe find a spot for the evening hatch.  I’m glad I did.  A few pools up, I hooked and landed a beautiful, buttery 14″ brown.  Because of the guy’s warning though, I left my camera and gear at the truck.  At least I had the net this time.

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Before I left, I had to fish Junction Pool. If you don’t know the history, and if you are reading this you probably do, but Theodore Gordon is given credit as the father of American dry-fly fishing, and honed his flies and craft around this area.  I didn’t catch anything, but fishing there was special, and I happened to be completely alone.  I’m guessing that’s rare for Junction Pool.

Thanks for reading!

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